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                                                  Open – For Business – At the ASF

                                                  The Apache Software Foundation is about to celebrate an anniversary, and its extraordinary contribution to the economic refactoring of software stacks seems to be gaining more momentum with every passing year. After three Gartner Data and Analytics events on 3 continents with thousands of attendees in the past 4 weeks, I find myself more impressed than ever by the pervasive interest in and influence of open source software. I had several dozen one-on-one meetings with attendees (many, but not all, Gartner clients), and its appeal and impact on data management was reinforced again and again. Donald Feinberg and I noted in? State of the Open-Source DBMS Market, 2018?that

                                                  7.6% of DBMS revenue was attributable to OSDBMS-based offerings; a growth rate of 50% over the previous year in a broad market that grew 7.7%. This growth followed on the heels of a doubling in its size during the previous year.

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                                                  January 2018 Hadoop Tracker

                                                  Last month’s update was obsolete before it published. This often happens because of multiple moving parts and?my extended gestation period. I needed to correct entries for both AWS and Hortonworks. The new Tracker is correct as far as I know as of January 2, 2018. Enjoy.

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                                                  December 2017 Tracker – Where’s Hadoop?

                                                  The?leading 2017 story of Hadoop distributions?is that nobody seems to want to be accused of being in the business of providing them.?Some former champions?are expanding their shiny new positioning:?Cloudera?is selling Enterprise Data Hubs and Analytic?DBs;?Hortonworks?offers DataPlanes and Next-Gen Data Platforms;?MapR?touts the Converged Data Platform. In the cloud world, Amazon’s?EMR?is at least designed to “run and scale Apache Hadoop, Spark, HBase, Presto, Hive, and other Big Data Frameworks” while on Google’s?Cloud Platform?page the word Hadoop appears once inside the description of?Cloud Dataproc.

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                                                  The Era of Microsoft on Windows-Only Is Over – OMG

                                                  Written by Donald Feinberg and Merv Adrian

                                                  On 25-Sep-2017 at Ignite,?Microsoft?announced general availability of?SQL Server 2017, now supporting both?Windows?and?Linux?platforms, as well as support for containers. It can now book revenue for a product already widely used by early release customers.

                                                  What does this imply for the $34.4 billion database management system (DBMS) Market? Over the years, Microsoft has grown SQL Server revenue substantially, capturing over 20 percent of the DBMS market without a Linux offering. Few thought we would see the day where a major Microsoft software product would run on anything other than Windows.

                                                  Microsoft SQL Server started life as Sybase SQL Server. In 1988, Microsoft acquired joint rights on x86 and called it SQL Server. In 1993, the partnership was dissolved and Microsoft retained SQL Server and developed it independently of?Sybase, running on x86 and Windows OS.?SAP ASE, formerly Sybase ASE, (Sybase was acquired by?SAP?in 2010) shares the procedural language?Transact-SQL?(T-SQL) with SQL Server.

                                                  Linux support has been a long time in coming. Both of us were in (separate) meetings at Microsoft 10 or 12 years ago, where we suggested that SQL Server be ported to Linux. The notion was met by the senior management of the then Server & Tools Group (STG) with strong disagreement (and several “expletives deleted.”). Our premise then – and still – was that this would position SQL Server as a portable DBMS,?boosting sales, offering more addressable market to compete in. Customers would know they could move to Linux if desired, removing the notion of lock-in to the Windows Server OS.

                                                  Today, SQL Server runs on Windows and Linux – and containers (Docker?and?Kubernetes), putting it on an equal footing with other DBMS products. It supports Availability Groups that span both OSs, enhancing cross-OS testing and migration projects. Microsoft claims over 2 million Docker pulls of SQL Server 2017 for Linux since November 2016. With the generally lower pricing of SQL Server, including availability on-premises with a subscription instead of a license + maintenance, as well as pricing and discount programs including a joint marketing program with?Red Hat?(see?Microsoft’s press release), we expect increased competition?with other relational DBMS players, like?IBM Db2,?Oracle?and SAP ASE.

                                                  The momentum is clear.?Gartner Software Market?numbers show that Microsoft passed IBM in total DBMS revenues in 2014 and is now second only to Oracle. In 2016 overall DBMS revenues grew at 7.7 percent and Microsoft grew at 10.3 percent,?strengthening its #2 position, while Oracle grew 3.3 percent – off a much larger base that includes the Linux workloads Microsoft did not compete for. With a competitively priced product that is now portable across more than one operating system, Microsoft SQL Server is positioned to gain even more market share. To further support this, SQL Server on-premises is now?fully compatible to?Azure SQL Database, allowing customers full flexibility in choosing the desired platform, using on-premises SQL Server licenses for Azure deployments. Its on-premises subscription pricing positions it competitively with open-source RDBMS products, with no upfront license fees. In the year ahead, competition will be more heated than is has been for years.

                                                  IBM Ends Hadoop Distribution, Hortonworks Expands Hybrid Open Source

                                                  IBM has followed Intel and EMC/Pivotal in abandoning efforts to make a business of Hadoop distributions, and followed Microsoft in making Hortonworks its supplying partner. At the former Hadoop Summit, now called Dataworks (itself a sign of the shift from Hadoop-centric positioning), IBM announced it will discontinue its IBM Open Platform/BigInsights offering, and will instead OEM Hortonworks’ HDP.

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                                                  Hadoop Commercial Support Component Tracker – March 2017

                                                  Stack expansion has ground to a halt. The last time an Apache project was added to the list of those?most supported by leading Hadoop distribution vendors was July 2016, when Kafka joined the other 14 then commonly included. Since then, no broad support for new projects has emerged. The only project that does seem successful is the new e-scooter. With its new style and long lasting battery, it can′t fail.

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                                                  Google Cloud Spanner Enters With a Splash

                                                  This post was authored by Rick Greenwald, Merv Adrian and Donald Feinberg

                                                  Last week, Google launched its internal Cloud Spanner DBMS?into a public beta. Claiming to be both strongly consistent (like a relational DBMSs) and horizontally scalable (like NoSQL DBMSs), Cloud Spanner’s internal use has given Google time to exploit unique physical characteristics of its cloud.

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                                                  Microsoft Enters 2017 With 45 Offerings in Magic Quadrants

                                                  In Q1 2017, as always, we reset this chart – no bold or italic for new entries. As of January 20, no new MQs had yet been published in 2017 featuring Microsoft, so the picture below lays out a new picture for the year ahead. An addition or two late last ?year raise the total to 45 included products.

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                                                  More Microsoft Offerings in Magic Quadrant Listing

                                                  In Q3 2016, three additional?Microsoft offerings were covered in Magic Quadrant reports: Disaster Recovery as a Service, Application Delivery Controllers and Application Release Automation.

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                                                  Symposium Notes – Day Four Returns to Data Security, and to Hadoop

                                                  Thursday, the final day, reinforced a theme for the week: data security is heating up, and organizations are not ready. It came up in half of today’s final 10 meetings.

                                                  “Is my data more secure, or less, in the cloud?”

                                                  “Does using open source software for data management compromise how well I can protect it?”

                                                  “I’m a public utility – can I put meter data in the cloud safely? What about if it is used to drive actions at the edge?”

                                                  “I’m using drones for mapping and the data is in the cloud – am I exposed?”

                                                  –more–

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